rolling stones

In Songwriting, One Word is All it Takes

It never fails to fascinate me how one word can unlock an entire song.

I was in the gym the other day and “Speechless” by Dan + Shay was playing. It was the first time I’d heard it, and it was instantly memorable. With that one word they did what so many of us songwriters are trying to do—find a way to express something universal in a fresh way. “Speechless” is just another love song. But it’s love as seen through a very particular lens. That lens is the concept, and the concept is the word.

Not only does the song revolve around one specific word, but that word revolves around one specific moment. No one is speechless for any length of time. It happens in a split second that leaves you slack-jawed. Drawing on a specific emotionally-charged moment like that gives your writing clarity and vigor. Without that focus, you often end up in the land of platitudes and generalities.

Or take another single-word-titled love song, “Crazy” by Willie Nelson. One word, one concept. And not a terribly unusual word either. Both “Speechless” and “Crazy” are ordinary, everyday words. But in a good writer’s hands they take on extraordinary meaning.

Sometimes my songwriting students get hung up, thinking they can’t use words that have already been used. Get over that. Gnarls Barkley did when he wrote his own version of a song called “Crazy”. I’m sure there were plenty of naysayers telling him he should steer clear of that word. But once it was released, none of us seemed to mind as we all belted it out for about a year straight—while along the way it topped the Billboard charts, won a Grammy, and eventually ended up on Rolling Stones 500 Greatest Songs of all Time list.

Then there’s the question of how you sing that one word. Think about how Mick Jagger sings the word “Satisfaction.” Sat-is-fac-tion. It comes out of his mouth all choppy, both frustrated and orgasmic at once. The fractured delivery adds to the meaning.

Going back to the two versions of  “Crazy,” the same holds true.  Willie just about sighs that word, doesn’t he? You can almost hear him shrugging, shaking his head, as the melody lilts from high to low, low to high. Gnarls did the exact opposite. His “Crazy” was exasperated, bursting with energy, top of his range, a total unleashing of pent-up energy.

Same word, different feeling.

There are nearly 200,000 words in the English dictionary. Open it up, pick one, and turn it into a song. Or, the next time a particular word catches your ear in conversation, jot it down and see where you can take it. If all else fails, you can simply write your own version of “Crazy”.

If you want some guidance along the way, or you’d like learn more about the craft of songwriting in general, book a free trial songwriting lesson with me today.

How Would I Hold You? A Question and a Song

How would I hold you… if the sky was falling down?

This is what I asked myself in bed with my wife one night.

That’s often how songs begin for me. With a line that just appears. Over the years, you train yourself to notice them. Little things people say or phrases that cross your mind.

OK, here goes.

P.S. After you listen to the full song below, listen to me croak out the initial seeds of the idea.

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